We The People Holsters Review Maine’s Hunting Season Laws

we the people holsters review maine's hunting season laws

Maine is essentially half wildlife territory and half-civilized. It is very comparable to locations like Washington state or Canada. With the enormous amount of wildlife, there is nearly always an open season for hunters. However, the hunting laws are different for residents of Maine in comparison to the laws for visiting hunters.

We The People Holsters is going to review some of these laws so that you know what to expect when hunting in Maine. We’ll also go over some of the lesser well-known hunting laws in this state so that you do not get yourself in hot water with a wildlife and game warden. It may surprise you to learn that you may need multiple hunting licenses in this state. Our We The People Holsters review will cover which licenses you will need and provide our opinion on the best approach to hunting in Maine.

Deer Hunting – All Firearms, All Month

Whether you shoot with a Henry repeating rifle or with a .45 hunting revolver, you will probably love the fact that Maine lets you hunt deer for an entire month in November. As long as you have the correct license for it, you can use any firearm to take out your deer. Maine only allows you to bag and keep ONE deer, which is the downside to this situation.

On the flip side, if you obtain a WMD (Wildlife Management District) hunting license, you are allowed to shoot more than one deer. It comes with a few quid pro quos, of course, but the cost of a WMD license and being able to shoot deer all month instead of the “one and done” of the standard deer season license is worth it. Usually you are only allowed to take a deer from each of the districts marked on the Wildlife and Game’s map.

Maine Resident-Only Day

If you live in Maine, you have an advantage compared to all out-of-state hunters. Maine gives its resident hunters their own day to hunt. For example, Maine hunters can only take one moose the entire moose hunting season of late September to late November, in designated WMDs. However, Maine has a resident only hunting day on October 30th in WMDs 15 and 16 which is a great advantage for residents, but it is something that non-resident hunters should be aware of.

Youth Hunting Days

Similarly, there are “youth only” hunting days. Kids over the age of twelve and under the age of 18 may hunt with a “sub-permit” under their parents’ hunting license. On the designated youth only days, one parent may escort the hunting youth into the woods. This is a great way to introduce teens to the sport and not have to worry about competition from the adult hunters for the same prize game. There’s also a “five and under” license for hunting, but it relates to hunting much smaller game. These permit days are also different from “junior hunter” days in which the teen has to be 16 years old, but not yet 18, to hunt deer and bear.

We The People Holsters review many laws and understand that these young hunter laws can be confusing, especially since Maine will let 16-year-olds hunt a bear, but not a moose. Additionally, paying extra fees on an adult license and then paying for additional licenses to shoot specific animals during these special hunting days may seem like a lot. However, if you really love hunting and want to share it with your kids, it’s worth it.

The Oddest Hunting Law of All

One of the oddest hunting laws in Maine is that there is NO open hunting season on cottontail rabbit, lynx, or spruce grouse, but you can hunt bobcat, wolf, fox, skunk, opossum, raccoon, and squirrel during specific hunting seasons. For the most part, you can hunt these more exotic species during deer and moose seasons, but the one caveat is that nighttime coyote hunting is only allowed from December to August. If you wanted to make hunting a way of life for yourself and/or your family in Maine, there is something to hunt all year long. The amount of edible game you are allowed to take would keep your freezer stocked quite a while.

As for the “meat” from these more exotic species, people do eat it. If you would rather not eat it, you can let the butcher that removes the hide decide on what to do with the flesh. All the same, it’s an unusual law to have an open season on animals most people don’t hunt for food, while preventing an open season on animals that might make good food (with the exception of the Lynx). The reason for this unusual law is that these three animals are endangered. If they were not endangered, they would not be forbidden. There is hope that this sort of game might eventually return to the “hunting allowed” list.

Hunting Gun Laws in Maine

Finally, you do have to register your hunting guns in Maine. Muzzleloaders, rifles, shotguns, and certain handguns are allowed for shooting game. Accessories such as silencers are not allowed, but sights for any type of gun are allowed. When you’re preparing your trip and arriving in Maine, make sure you check the open season dates for the game you want to hunt, you have exactly the right licenses and permits for out-of-state or resident hunting, and that you are only carrying the allowed weapons. Good luck hunting and we hope you enjoyed We The People Holsters review of Maine’s hunting laws. And if you’re interested in doing some lobster fishing, our friends at LobsterAnywhere wrote this piece in Maine’s lobster fishing laws.

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